Durarara’s quincunx

I wasn’t expecting anything from Durarara. I still don’t, because it’s still in its formative stages. But what I have seen simply oozes with both style and quality. The series is heavy with dialogue and characterization, something I am not averse to. The first episode did not blow me away, however: it just made me feel that the anime series knew what it was and what it was going to be, and it paced itself carefully. Mikado’s epiphany in the first episode simply felt that it was actually just the beginning, but the central focus, or at least what really drives the story is Certy Sturlson, the headless motorbike driver.

The opening credits and the ending credits, however, are other stories altogether. Compared with the sanity and realistic tone of the first episode (everyone seems so real and so seated in Tokyo [except of course for the motorbike driver and Heiwajima, but even it's arguable that people like him can exist in real life]), both the opening and the ending just exudes a coolness and confidence in it that does not rely on catchy tunes sang by cutesy voices. How they introduce the focal characters in the story was very impressive. I liked how they were able to portray Orihara Izaya and Heiwajima Shizuo’s character in just the opening. I suspected Izaya was just like Itsuki Kamiyama of the GOTH manga, and he pretty much was: he was unscrupulous, mordant, and sharp, as we have seen in the second episode. On the other hand, the ending credits were not as visually impressive, but the aural effect of the music was still pleasant. To some extent, I was reminded of the excellent audio from Samurai Champloo, especially because of the jazzy music.

The third episode merely continued the excellence of the first two episodes. Having said that, I wrote of Durarara as a quincunx primarily because the secondary characters center on Mikado’s triad, with all revolving around the presence (or absence) of Certy Sturlson, the headless (horse)woman. The beauty of Durarara is the ambivalent humanity of its characters. In the second episode, Izaya was peggged to be simply quite an asshole; however, in the third episode it can be noted that he appreciates kindness and courage just like any other man but with his own methods. While the show really is transcended by the presence of her, the characters and their relationships are multivariant and colorful as each other.

durarara-relations

From this point on I still do not know where the series is going towards. But I find it really entertaining and smart, something I find in only a few anime series. I’m hoping that it keeps its pace up. It’s also very refreshing to see certain references to anime that have aired recently such as Cencoroll, Jigoku Shoujo, and Kuroshitsuji. (Baccano aired some time ago, but it was done by the same studio and the same writer that does Durarara! I thought it was a subtle and well-done easter egg in the show.)

Baccano, Cencoroll, Kuroshitsuji, Jigoku Shoujo, Aria (?), Jigoku Shoujo

Baccano, Cencoroll, Kuroshitsuji, Jigoku Shoujo, Aria (?), Jigoku Shoujo

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5 Responses to “Durarara’s quincunx”

  1. Taka Says:

    The 3rd one is Baccano again pretty sure it’s supposed to be Maiza Avaro and Czeslaw Meyer.

    The 5th one could potentially be Baccano as well she looks like Ladd’s silent lover Lua Klein.

  2. Kairu Says:

    That’s not definitely Aria.

  3. frog212 Says:

    oh yea!! the 5th one does look like Lua. I knew I saw that image somewhere.

  4. Bob (joojoobees) Says:

    > In the second episode, Izaya was peggged to be simply quite an asshole;
    > however, in the third episode it can be noted that he appreciates kindness
    > and courage just like any other man but with his own methods.

    Eloquently put. Izuya’s “ambiguous humanity” was the crux of this episode for me.

  5. Ryan A Says:

    Yes, I’m quite enjoying every bit! :)

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